Tributes to 9-11 heroism never too soon

The gravity of the events of 9-11 and the emotions therein do not come from the loss of four airplanes, a portion of the Pentagon nor the seven buildings comprising the World Trade Center. Though the monetary loss was gigantic, it was the loss of lives that made that day what it has become.

Some recall it as a "day that will live in infamy" or the "day we saw evil." Regardless, it was the day when hundreds of passengers and crew members aboard those planes, thousands in the World Trade Center and innumerable others around the world lost their lives, their loved ones and their understanding of the world around them.

Sept. 11, 2001 is about people and the stories of the events and of the lives touched.

Films serve a number of purposes in modern society. At its roots, the film industry is often accused of being inconsiderate and greedy. Though there may be some degree of truth in this, there is more than predators looking for weak people on whom they can prey for a profit.

It would seem artistic vision and intentions remain in the production of modern films.

The fact of the matter is the two films released told the stories of people affected by 9-11 using artistic methods to portray the events and the emotions involved. While some say it is too soon, the release of the films still has a purpose.

The intentions of the producers, directors and actors were by no means malevolent. No desire to mock or harm those killed or those affected existed.

The intention of each film seems to be one of honor and respect. It seems difficult to claim it is inappropriate to create such a film merely because it happened only five years ago.

Both of these films attempt to show stories of courage and serve as a tribute to the "heroes" of 9-11. By doing this, the filmmakers are paying homage to all lives altered on 9-11, not just the lives of those who experienced it firsthand.

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